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Make a tall planter box from pallet wood with these easy steps 

  • By Riverside ReStore
  • 01 May, 2017
Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

I love working with pallet wood.

Each pallet board is unique in character, and has a mysterious story of travels and escapades that I’ll never know. It’s fun to think that the parts to this planter box could have been anywhere in the world and transported anything from tools to furniture to books and so much more.

So enough about my romance with pallets, let’s dig into the DIY of making this pallet planter box.

The Supplies

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

Pallet wood. Which you can often pick up at your local Habitat for Humanity ReStores!

Saw. A circular saw, miter saw, hand saw, table saw, or oscillating tool would all work. I used a cordless miter saw.

Drill or impact driver. I use a countersink to make a pilot hole before using fasteners when working with pallet wood. I also like to use Spax fasteners, as they are the easiest to sink in pallet wood.

Hand tools. The essential hand tools of a tape measure, pencil, multi-tool, pliers, hammer, and utility knife are part of a pallet DIY kit. The pliers, multi-tool, and utility knife are good to have for those pallet boards that have a rogue shape or nail sticking out from its previous life. Also, working solo on a project, it’s a good to have clamps nearby.

The How-To

For this project, I used parts of two pallets. To free pallet wood from a pallet, there are two ways that work really well. Either cross-cutting them along the supports with a circular saw or cutting the fasteners between the wood and the support with a reciprocating saw. A hand saw or an oscillating saw could free the wood, but it will take a bit longer. When working with saws, wear your safety glasses and closed-toe shoes.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore
Cross-cutting pallet wood along the supports with a circular saw is a fast way to free pallet wood for a project.
Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

Cutting the fasteners between the wood and the support with a reciprocating saw provides longer stretches of wood, but it takes a bit more time than a circular saw.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

After freeing the wood from the pallet, measure, mark, and cut the wood to length. This pallet planter is 40 inches tall, so I’m cutting two 40-inch long pieces to make each of the four corners for the box. If you have shorter lengths, you can add a block at the connection points to join the short pieces to make a 40-inch length.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

After each piece is cut, fasten two 40-inch pieces to make a corner of the planter.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

A clamp can be a huge helper when fastening wood at a 90 degree angle.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

With pallet wood, there are unexpected nails that may be proud of the wood, so a nail set and hammer can help push the nails back into the wood.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

After all four corner supports are constructed, start laying out the planter box. A square is a handy toolbelt tool that helps make sure the angles are exactly 90 degrees. 

Then it is time to fasten the planter box pieces with two screws in each side.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

After constructing one side, it’s time to put the planter project on a table to attach the other pieces.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

Each side is screwed together in two places.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

After the frame of the box is secure, the sides are filled in with more pallet wood. I like to hide fasteners on decorative projects, so I’m fastening the wood from the inside of the box.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

The wood thicknesses of pallets can vary slightly, and screws are spot-on the same length. An easy trick to make sure you don’t pierce through the other side of wood is to angle the way the screw goes in.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

For this project, I put in the bottom without attaching the pieces. This will make it easy to clean out the planter later. And if you are thinking that this might be perfect as a party drink station, the easy access to draining the bottom of the box will make party cleanup easier.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

For pallet projects, I always recommend sealing the wood. A clear sealer will work fine, if you love the look of pallet wood. I chose to add a turquoise wash—mixing water with paint—to give this planter color without compromising the rustic charm.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

I also used a gray wash for the other parts of the pallet planter.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

The inside of the planter is ready for plants. And you may not be able to see in the photo, but I dusted some glitter spray paint over the entire planter. It’s a subtle way to have fun moments of shine and glamour on a farmhouse-style planter.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

I purposefully chose pallet wood that has a bit of decomposition and age. I enjoy the shadows and textures that Mother Nature creates as wood ages. Now that it’s sealed, the aging process will greatly slow down.

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

Spring flowers inside the tall planter box also make me smile! I hope you enjoyed this project, and I wish you the best of luck with your next DIY project.

You can find more projects from Theresa at MyFixItUpLife.com , and you can get in touch with her on Twitter for any DIY questions you may have!

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, DIY, Planter, Project, Spring, Flowers, Riverside ReStore

Treasure Hunter's Blog

By Riverside ReStore 02 May, 2017

2 Part Time ReStore Team Members- Warehouse/  Driver Assistants

Scheduled up to 28 Hours per week, $10 per hour.
Warehousing, drivers assistant, inventory handling, large furniture moving, & transport experience a BIG PLUS.

Strength Requirement:
VERY HEAVY- Exerts in excess of 100 lbs of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 lbs of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 lbs of force constantly to move objects.

Availability
The right candidate must be available 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. or 11:15 pm to 6:15 pm 4 days per week (Monday- Saturday), monthly work schedule provided. 

Application process open until position is filled.
Applications available in store or via email request. Request/Return Application to: Cindy Tyrolt at info@riversiderestore.org with the subject line New Hire April/May 2017.
By Riverside ReStore 01 May, 2017
Shop & Save while earning your chance to enter to WIN our Opportunity Drawing prize. During the month of May every $50 you spend earns you a ticket to enter the Riverside ReStore’s Opportunity Drawing for $500 Riverside ReStore Bucks', “Bucks” are only redeemable at the Riverside ReStore only. Winner will be drawn and announced on June 1st.
By Riverside ReStore 01 May, 2017

I love working with pallet wood.

Each pallet board is unique in character, and has a mysterious story of travels and escapades that I’ll never know. It’s fun to think that the parts to this planter box could have been anywhere in the world and transported anything from tools to furniture to books and so much more.

So enough about my romance with pallets, let’s dig into the DIY of making this pallet planter box.

The Supplies

By Riverside ReStore 01 Apr, 2017

Home is the foundation for our lives, and should provide an atmosphere where individuals can thrive. Everyone deserves a safe, affordable place to call home.

For many families in the United States, the concept of home seems out of reach. Often, this is a result of living in inadequate conditions or paying rent beyond their means. Home has become a place they need to escape from, rather than escape to.

This April, support Habitat for Humanity Riverside’s local work as we participate in #HomeIsTheKey by shopping or donating at the Riverside ReStore.

You can be part of a key moment in a family’s future.   Become part of the movement:

By Riverside ReStore 01 Jan, 2017
Our DIY guru, Fern purchased 2 of these medicine cabinets at the Riverside ReStore last summer for only $10 each! She couldn’t pass up a deal like that, even if she was not sure what she was going to do with them. It wasn’t until recently that she found inspiration for this project, repurposing this old medicine cabinet to an adorable display case.
By Riverside ReStore 01 Jan, 2017

ReStored Furniture Extraordinaire, Beth, is at it again! This time restoring a once very used and warn down cushioned chair into a beautiful Paris inspired chair! Perfect for as a vanity seat.

Supplies needed:

  • Staple Gun
  • Screw Driver
  • Primer
  • Paint brushes
  • 2 Colors of General Purpose Paint
  • Sand Paper
  • Fabric (Beth used Paris Themed Burlap)
  • Cushion stuffing

Directions:

  1. Sand down the wood surface of the base of the chair
  2. First paint the piece with primer, then the general purpose paint
  3. Beth painted the interior of the piece tan and the outside black to create a contrast in color.
  4. Remove the old cushion and top of the seat by removing the screws from the bottom of the seat that held the padding to the frame.
  5. Change out the old stuffing with the new
  6. Lay fabric over the top of the new cushion piece and staple fabric to the bottom
  7. Reattach wood piece to the top of the seat using original screws.

 We want to see your #ReStoreFinds! Post your projectsusing #RiversideReStore, your creation might get featured in our blog!

About our DIYer:

Local entrepreneur, Beth Eckstrom, creator of Custom Furnishings , has taken what began as a project of necessity and turned it into a thriving business breathing new life into old furnishings. As a mother of two young children she began looking for a way to make the money that would allow her to stay at home with them. Beth has a knack for seeing beyond the worn and dated to create a look that is completely unique, decorative, one-of-a-kind and functional.

By Riverside ReStore 01 Jan, 2017

ReStored Furniture Extraordinaire, Beth, knew this piece was going to be a fixer upper. The wood had several deep cracks and it was a bit aged. Beth stepped up to the challenge, repaired the structure and restored the dresser to highlight its vintage features! The finished product was used as a coffee bar in a kitchen.

We cannot get over how cute it turned out!

Supplies Used:

  • Wood Puddy
  • Sandpaper
  • Spray Primer
  • General Purpose Paint 
  • Paint brushes or rollers
  • Dark Glaze
  • Wax
  • Furniture Piece (Check out your local Habitat for Humanity ReStore for your vintage furniture needs)

Directions:

  1. Repair cracks by filling them in with wood puddy
  2. Remove all hardware
  3. Sand down the entire surface to get rid of any paint or stainer on the piece.
  4. Spray the entire piece down with an even coat of spray primer.
  5. After the primer has dried, cover the piece with an even coat of paint
  6. Paint glaze on the surface, then wipe it off with a rag to create the aged, vintage look
  7. After glaze has dried, seal the piece with wax
  8. Reattach the hardware and admire your finished product!

We want to see your restored #ReStoreFinds! Post your projects with #RiversideReStore, your creation might get featured in our blog!

About our DIYer:

Local entrepreneur, Beth Eckstrom, creator of Custom Furnishings , has taken what began as a project of necessity and turned it into a thriving business breathing new life into old furnishings. As a mother of two young children she began looking for a way to make the money that would allow her to stay at home with them. Beth has a knack for seeing beyond the worn and dated to create a look that is completely unique, decorative, one-of-a-kind and functional.

By Riverside ReStore 01 Jan, 2017